SeaFood Business

JUN 2014

SeaFood Business is the global trusted authority for seafood buyers and sellers. We are the seafood industry's leading trade magazine with more than 30 years of experience. Our coverage is based on the "business" of buying and selling seafood.

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seafood species authenticity, achieved Marine Stewardship Council chain-of-custody cer- tifcation for its private-label seafood and partnered with the Global Aquaculture Al- liance for Best Aquaculture Practice certifcation of its private-label shrimp. True World Group True World Group LLC in Rockleigh, N.J., appointed Robert Bleu as president and Lawrence Mulvey as director of business develop- ment. True World Group is a management company under True World Holdings LLC, providing management assis- tance and consulting services for seafood-centered compa- nies. Previously Bleu served as president for six years for Shining Ocean, for which he worked for more than 21 years. Mulvey has 30 years of seafood industry experience, including more than a decade at Trans- Ocean and a period of service with Tai Foong USA. Tracey Schwartz succeeded Bleu as president of Shining Ocean. She has been with Shining Ocean for more than seven years, most recently as VP. Top Story Continued from page 24 Berry of Bluefn Seafood agrees, adding that every point in an oyster's journey from sea to dinner table is far better managed than in the past. Im- proved farming methods have yielded cleaner, safer products, and holding methods ensure fresher shellfsh. "Te bigger distributors and bigger farms have hold- ing tanks that extend that freshness," he says. "Te oys- ter is harvested, it goes into a saltwater tank and stays until it's ready to be delivered. It's a much better product now, and people can taste that." Rheault is encouraged by the rise in oyster sales, growth and improvements in production trend, but the upswing of people cooking at home has people teaching themselves," he says. "It's nice to see these home gourmets and home cooks cracking a few shells for a party and putting out a lovely taste of the sea." People also appreciate fresh- ness in oysters, which Rheault says has become a given with great over-the-road distribu- tion. He calls U.S. trucking, "magnifcent and insanely good" for its ability to move oysters from the coast to the heartland in only 36 hours and at a cost of $2 per box. and distribution, but he's a bit concerned all of it could combine to glut the market with supply and cause prices to crash. He says avoiding that calamity hinges on expanding demand for domestic oysters. "If we're boosting produc- tion at this rate, we better boost the customer base," he says. "I keep telling my mem- bers that if we don't do some intelligent marketing and maybe get more customers in the center of the country, we're headed for a price collapse." Voisin says markets always correct themselves by supply and demand, but the lifelong oysterman doesn't foresee as hard a correction as concerns Rheault. As is the case with Gulf oysters, when one fsh- ery's supplies are short, oth- ers are healthy and help to meet demand. He doubts all will produce so well at once that the oyster market will be glutted. "In the high harvest sea- son, when there are tons of oysters out there and prices fall, people will say, 'What's going on? People aren't lov- ing oysters!'" says Voisin. "But the answer is, 'No, that's not the problem. Tere's just a whole lot out of oysters out there now, Bubba.'" Contributing Editor Steve Coomes lives in Louisville, Ky. People in the News Global Aquaculture Alliance Te Global Aquaculture Al- liance in St. Louis expanded its market development team with the addition of Carson Roper as international busi- ness development manager for its Best Aquaculture Prac- tices (BAP) program. Based in France, Roper has 30 years of seafood experience in various capacities, including sustain- ability initiatives and aquacul- ture certifcation schemes. Marel Sigurdur Olason is the new managing director of Marel's Fish Industry Center. Based in Gardabaer, Iceland, Ola- son succeeds Jon Birgir Gun- narsson, who is leaving the company. Olason previously worked on product develop- ment for Marel from 2001 to 2006. During the last six years he was manager of business development with Samherji, a leading seafood company in Iceland. Shaw's Crab House Peter Balodi- mas is execu- tive chef for Shaw's Crab Group in Chi- cago and Schaumburg, Ill., owned by the Lettuce Enter- tain You Restaurants in Chi- cago. Balodimas has almost 20 years of experience. He held positions at Tin Fish in Tinley Park, Ill., and Spiaggia in Chicago. He was the chef- owner of Fahrenheit in St. Charles, Ill., which was nomi- nated as a top 10 new restau- rant by Chicago magazine, and served as executive chef of several of chef Jose Garces' restaurants in Philadelphia, Arizona and California. Trans-Ocean Surimi producer Trans-Ocean Products named Murray Park president and Itaru Kawada executive VP. Park served as VP and general manager for the company, a Bellingham, Wash., subsidiary of Maru- ha-Nichiro since 2012. He also held management posi- tions at Westward Seafoods, another Maruha-Nichiro sub- sidiary. Park replaced Yasuaki Kawakita , who moved to a new position within Maruha- Nichiro. Kawada also worked at Westward, running the company's Dutch Harbor, Alaska, processing facility. He also served at Maruha- Nichiro's ofce in Tokyo as surimi seafood manager. NSF International Public health organization NSF International in Ann Arbor, Mich., named Greg Brown its global managing director of seafood under its Global Food Division. He is based in NSF's Shanghai of- fce where he leads a team that provides product evalua- tions, laboratory testing, facil- ity audits and certifcation for seafood companies through- out the supply chain. Brown's three decades of food industry experience includes developing Darden Restaurants' seafood quality inspection and safety testing program in Asia, which serves as the foundation for NSF's Global Seafood Pro- gram. As category director for seafood for US Foods, Brown initiated DNA testing for Visit us online at www.seafoodbusiness.com June 2014 SeaFood Business 37 22_24 Top story june sfb.indd 37 5/16/14 11:11 AM

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